Deutzer Brücke

Deutzer Brücke, 50667 Cologne

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listed building

1948, 1976-80

1950s-70s

Architekt Gerd Lohmer

Bundesrepublik Deutschland
Stadt Köln

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Deutzer Brücke

Finished in 1948, Deutzer Brücke was the then slimmest girder bridge. Its steel girder design is the world’s first of its kind.
Above the carriage way there are no longer any bearing parts that might obstruct the view of the River Rhine and the Cologne townscape.
The steel hollow girder structure of 1948 from 1976 to 1980 was widened by a reinforced concrete twin structure.
The bridge’s total length is 437m, the arch span 132, 184 and 120m respectively. After the expansion of 1980, the width is now 32.6m and accommodates two carriageways, a two-track tram line and foot and cycle paths on both sides. The reinforced concrete structure of the expansion has no fittings and thus contains three walkable rooms, which are used for art installations and concerts.

Author: Editorial Staff baukunst-nrw
Last changed on 23.10.2007

 

Categories:
Engineering » Transportation

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